Something To Prove

Beaumont the Sheepadoodle and I are walking back from the river.

He is not great on-leash. Some might say he’s awful. (Sorry Beau. It’s true.)

He tugs and pulls, especially if we’re on our way to the park. On the way home is not as bad. Unless he sees a squirrel. Or another dog. Or a leaf blowing in the wind. Or a butterfly. Or… you get the picture.

Anyway. We’re walking home and he’s pulling and I want him to pay attention. To me.

I stop about 10 feet from the crosswalk at Bowness Road. The deal is, when I stop, he has to stop and sit and then make eye contact with me before we move on.

He does the stop and sit well. The eye contact. Well, let’s just say he can take his time getting there. Like lots of time.

This particular day I’m into what feels like minute gazillion of waiting and he’s still looking around refusing to make eye contact when a voice behind me says, “Excuse me ma’am?”

Startled, I turn my head and see a young boy, about 12 years old, on a bike. He’s stopped on the road beside me and is looking at me with concern.

My mind immediately jumps to, ‘I wonder if he’s lost’ when he says, “Do you need help crossing the street ma’am?”

I almost burst out laughing but manage to control myself and reply (sweetly, I promise), “Oh. Thank you so much. That’s so kind of you. But no, I’m just waiting for my dog to pay attention to me before we cross.”

The young boy nods his head (I’m not sure he believed that I didn’t need help) but with an “Oh. Okay,” he gets back on his bike and rides off.

I didn’t wait for Beau to make eye contact. I pressed the crosswalk light and we crossed.

I had something to prove.

_______________________________________

Footnote: This happened shortly after I read one of those memes on FB about how what’s wrong with the younger generation today is they respect no one because parents/teachers can no longer use corporal punishment.

My father used to give me the strap when I was young, the writer said, and I’m okay.

I disagree on two counts.

You’re not okay if you think having your butt or hands strapped as a child didn’t hurt you.

And the second count, as this young boy so beautifully showed, there’s nothing wrong with the younger generation (other than perhaps their eyesight).

15 thoughts on “Something To Prove”

  1. Hahaha! That goes in the pile with the first “ma’am” we receive, or the “getting the senior discount” – like my 56-year old friend got the other day… she was at first pissed off then realised, screw it, I’ll take the deal…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ahh…, Louise, what an uplifting story. I also feel quite upset when the
    young are inconsiderate and worse. Like you, I have found the opposite.
    The belief that corporal punishment is right and that anyone still believes this!!! it beggers belief.

    By the way, what is wrong with being escorted by a handsome young
    boy.:)
    Miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This was most heartening to read. I wish more positive incidents would be shared instead of just negative ones. Kudos to the young boy showing respectful concern.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My takeaway- Seeing the decency and good behavior in any young person is very encouraging and gives one hope, for sure!
    However, many are indeed, troubled, and are sorely lacking in parental guidance and a moral compass. I try to avoid lumping groups of people into an β€œall” category, as it simply not accurate.
    So many variables go into the making of an β€œadult”. Corporal punishment? Not sure on that one- still depends on so many other factors in ones overall experience. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you DL for your thoughtful response. I hear you and yes, ‘lumping’ is damaging to all of us. I think you have the title of a book — “The Making of an Adult” In my 60’s, I’m still, in the making! πŸ™‚

      Like

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