The Value of Vulnerability — Guest blog

The first time I watched Brene Brown’s Ted Talk on Vulnerability was shortly after it appeared in 2010. I was hooked. Gave the link to my daughter. Shared it with everyone I know. Read, The Gift of Imperfection and recommended it with everyone I know.

Today, guest blogger, Ian Munro. shares the value of vulnerability in our lives — not only will it help lower stress, you’ll love yourself and your life a whole lot more!

Thanks Ian for sharing your light so graciously. Thanks for being so vulnerable!

 

The Value of Vulnerability

By Ian Munro

The holiday season is behind us and we are back to our normal work routine. It gave me pause to reflect back on the past several weeks. This year I worked through the break, having taken my vacation earlier in the year. Normally I would find working through the holidays somewhat burdensome but this year was totally different. I found myself using this slower time of the year to have some slow, meaningful conversations with people. With both time and some solitude as the office wasn’t very busy, these conversations often penetrated through a few layers of the normal office shields we wear to protect our essential selves. They were great connections, and I look at them now and see how uncommon it is for us to reveal the true nature of ourselves to each other, especially within a work environment.  To read the rest of Ian’s fabulous article, click here!

14 thoughts on “The Value of Vulnerability — Guest blog”

  1. This post follows closely the essence of a discussion I had with friends just yesterday. We were exploring the question of what we both risk and gain by revealing our authentic self in family and work situations. Is the perceived ‘risk’ sometimes simply an ego-driven illusion? The very real benefit is a sense of connectedness and easing of tension and anxiety. Ironically, by letting go of our personal expectations of perfection and control we somehow stumble upon self acceptance.

    Like

    1. I gave The Gift of Imperfection to a woman I was coaching – she read it twice, and like so many said- it changed my life.

      And you’re welcome – I like introducing amazing people to one another!

      Like

  2. Did you also hear Brene Brown on NPR’s “On Being”? I highly recommend it! I’d seen the TED talk first, and she talks about how that came to be and why she would never have done it if she’d known.

    Like

  3. Hi Louise and Ian!

    Thanks for re-posting this… it is definite food for thought!

    Let’s be vulnerable with ourselves first.

    Let’s JUST BE okay…. if we have a bad day, make a bad decision, lose a love (or two, or three!) or a job, or our mind.

    Let’s always self love FIRST. (Man, is THAT hard work! ) This is the definition of THE WORK:

    – Self forgiveness,
    – the ability to say to ourselves and others – I got lost, I lost it, I checked out for awhile, I didn’t know what to do,
    – Please help me find answers.
    – Please connect with me…

    When we admit our vulnerability, it takes us on a journey of self discovery. We get to the other side by taking the curtain away from “having it all together” , by exposing ourselves, forgiving ourselves and embracing vulnerability as part of the journey.
    🙂

    Like

  4. Hi Louise: I commented on this on Ian’s blog
    “This post is timely for me as I struggle with the terms of my divorce settlement which will probably involve me taking over our business on my own with a large debt-load and me pondering as to how I can manage when I am feeling so crushed inside. How can I become the ‘strong’ leader that is required to survive? How can I be an inspiration to my staff? Your post opens up the door for me to not only allow myself to be vulnerable, but that vulnerability is a hidden strength. This has lifted my spirits. Thank you.”

    And thanks to you too. I have been following Ian for some weeks now, having picked him up from your blog roll.
    He has some thought-provoking ideas that are actually applicable to real-life situations.

    Like

Real conversations begin with your comments. Please share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.